The latest desktop release of the Brave browser features Private Tabs with Tor, a technology for protecting users against network surveillance. Mozilla is also working to integrate Tor in its popular Firefox browser.

The latest desktop release of the Brave browser features Private Tabs with Tor, a technology for protecting users against network surveillance. This new functionality, currently in beta, integrates Tor into the browser and gives users a new browsing mode that helps protect their privacy not over the network.

You can try this now: Download and launch Brave 0.23. Choose the new menu option "New Private Tab with Tor," and open checkip.org. You'll see that your IP address is different from the usual, perhaps in another country or another continent.

"You're seeing a rising consciousness about privacy," said Brave CEO Brendan Eich, as reported by CNET. "We're playing a long game here. We're putting energy on the side of privacy, and part of that involves energy on the hard case. Tor is the hard case."

"We're honest about the fact that we're not the Tor browser. It has a much higher level of security testing," added Brave Chief Information Security Officer Yan Zhu. "If you're using it because your life depends on it, you should be using Tor and not Brave with Tor tabs."

The Tor network, operated by volunteers, allows people to improve their privacy and security by connecting to the internet through a series of virtual tunnels rather than making a direct connection, thus hiding their IP and identity.The Tor browser, maintained by the Tor project, is a browser that connects to the internet through the full network. Versions of Tor that filter all internet traffic are also available.

It/s important to emphasize that the "private tabs" available in other browsers are not so private. "Studies show that users expect private tabs prevent things like ISPs tracking them or other people on Wi-Fi tracking them," but in fact ordinary private tabs don't, explained Zhu. "Tor private tabs bring private tabs much closer to what the user expects private tabs to do."

Brave supports Tor by operating Tor network nodes. Last year, Brave launched a Basic Attention Token (BAT) to power a blockchain-based digital advertising platform, based on Ethereum smart contracts, aimed at reducing the invasive ads, often with embedded user tracking, spyware and even malware, which plague today's internet. The BAT token sale raised $35 million in less than 30 seconds.

Those who love Tor, privacy, and the blockchain-based crypto-economy, should love Brave. But, by drastically reducing the footprint of websites and all the garbage that infects other browsers, Brave is a godsend for everyone. Try it: Your browsing sessions will be much faster with Brave.

Brave CEO Brendan Eich is the creator of JavaScript and a former Mozilla CEO. It's worth noting that Mozilla is also working to integrate Tor in its popular Firefox browser. The project, called Fusion (Firefox USIng ONions), is experimental and in the beginning phases. The end goal of Fusion is "to bring the cutting-edge security and privacy features to Firefox users by leveraging the technologies of Tor Browser and Tor Proxy."

"We decided to strengthen our collaboration by integrating Tor functionality directly into Firefox," said Firefox product manager Peter Dolanjski, a Firefox product manager, as reported by CNET. "This collaboration brings two benefits: it speeds up development for Tor and also allows Firefox to bring cutting-edge privacy enhancing technology to more users."

Picture from Wikimedia Commons.

Never miss a thing and suscribe to our newsletter.

Crypto Insider Editor Giulio Prisco is a writer specialized in science, technology and business. He is persuaded that crypto has the potential to bring disruptive positive changes to the internet and society at large.

You may also like:

 

Be the first to know about the latest
crypto news

Suscribe to our weekly newsletter sent straight to your inbox